Is there a RIGHT way to change the runway?

I’m stubborn…very stubborn.

I flew into a non-towered airport today with two runways. It was mid-morning, so the wind had shifted at some point from calm to out of the south. The runways were 10/28, 18/36. Winds shifting between 170 and 200 at 6-7 knots. There were a couple other airplanes in the pattern for 1-0, and I imagine they had been there for the past hour or so since they were using that runway. And here I come, out of the Northeast, looking to set my struggling student up with the fewest worries. No tower, calmer winds, and so on. We set up the way we should for runway 1-8, calling inbound, saying our intentions to cross mid-field and enter back on a right 45.

One of the instructors already there jumps on and tells me “a couple aircraft are already using 1-0”.

What do I do? Of course this had to be on an off-day, a day I’m not in the greatest of moods (a whole blog could be made into why no one should fly in a bad mood!)…So I reply “Winds are at 1-8-0, at 7 knots, I’m trying to switch it up to the more favorable runway”…and I bluntly add in, “go back to [insert home airport here] airport and get your crosswind practice there!” Shouldn’t have said that, I know, but again…not off to a great start for the day.

“The wind is barely noticeable, you’ll be okay.”

Now we’re attacking my skills? “Just trying to teach my student right, trying to use the right runway.”

Eventually the couple of planes switched over and continued on as if nothing happened.

So I have a question today…did I take the right action?

I could have easily entered the pattern for runway 1-0 and dealt with the light crosswind/tailwind and gone on with the day. But at what point do we say there needs to be a change? Winds were forecast to be out of the south for the entire day, so at what point does someone finally say “let’s make a change!”

Whether my actions were right or wrong (disclaimer: I’m still learning, as everyone should be, especially when it comes to flying!), should someone be met with an angry voice on the other side of the mic? Is that really constructive? I guess with every “family” there are going to be confrontations, I’m just sad to hear it when everyone is learning. My student, his student, everyone.

I’ve had the reverse happen to me. Being at an airport, winds changing, and someone else coming in and changing to the new runway. It’s inconvenient, yes, but since when is an inconvenience a bad thing in aviation? Only when you don’t accommodate for it?

Please, opinions are welcome, I’m open to new or better ways to handle situations! We are only able to make decisions to the extent of our experience, training, and the experience of others! So…what would you have done?

To more learning experiences!

Up in the Air

Originally Written: April 20, 2012 // Rewritten: April 29, 2012

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Memoirs of a Flight Instructor

Hello to all who stumbled across this, probably by accident!

Memoirs of a Flight Instructor is a blog dedicated to my experiences as a flight instructor. My overall goal is to cater to a variety of readers. Some posts may interest all, and all posts may interest none, but the goal is to help out as many students, instructors, and aviation enthusiasts as possible.

There will be posts from my personal life (not related to flying – but perhaps in some way a life lesson?). Primarily, Memoirs of a Flight Instructor is designed to cover topics that relate directly to aviation such as:

  • Personal stories and experiences related to flying
  • How to break into the aviation industry – “learning to fly”
  • Improving as an aviation instructor
  • Common student questions / concerns

Topics suggestions are always welcome!

For those of you who found this on PURPOSE, you may know of Memoirs of a Flight Instructor from Google’s blogspot.com. I’m trying to decide which place is the better place to host the blog, so here goes my try at wordpress.

Whichever design I like more, I’ll be going with! Let me know what you think too, because that will also play a part in my decision!

Cheers,

Up in the Air